Overtime and Unpaid Wages- Recovering pay for all time worked and earned overtime

The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that as many as 80% of employers fail to properly pay all employees for all of the hours worked and proper overtime.  The Georgia wage and hour lawyers at Kenneth S. Nugent, P.C. have the experience needed to help employees recover all of the wages and overtime to which they are entitled.

The following are common examples where an employee is not paid for all of the time worked. You should be paid for that extra time. Adding this extra time may push you over 40 hours in a week, so that you are also owed overtime at 1 ½ your regular rate of pay.

Do any of these things apply to you?

  • I regularly start work before normal business hours or work through lunch, but do not get paid for my time.
  • I work late or on the weekends checking e-mail or texts or completing paperwork; but do not get paid for all my time.
  • I travel by plane or car for my job, including weekends, during normal business hours; but do not get paid for all of my travel time.
  • My employer will not pay me overtime because I am paid a salary; even though I don’t  hire and fire others, or have any significant authority over business decisions of the company, or have a professional degree.
  • My employer will not pay me overtime because I am labeled an Independent Contractor.
  • I am offered comp time instead of overtime pay and do not work for the government.
  • My supervisor regularly adjusts my work time down or a “company policy” discourages me from submitting all of my work time.
  • The Company does not keep accurate records of my work time and I don’t get paid for overtime hours at 1 ½ times my pay rate.
  • If an employee complains about overtime, they get fired or disciplined.

You can find a more detailed discussion of the FLSA, your rights, and common violations by employers, by clicking here: Overtime and Unpaid Wage Claims in Georgia: Defend Your Right to Minimum Wage or Overtime Payment

Helping Georgia employees recover all the wages they are due—One call, that’s all.

An employer may owe you for (1) up to three years of unpaid overtime, plus (2) an additional, equal amount of that owed overtime called “liquidated damages”, and (3) attorney’s fees and costs.

If your job puts you in any of these situations, you may be eligible to file a claim. Attorneys at Kenneth S. Nugent, P.C. are currently researching claims regarding unpaid wages. Contact us today. 1-800-CALL-KEN.

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Overtime & Unpaid Wages Blog